10 Things I Should Be Doing Instead Of Reading


As appealing as being stranded on an island with nothing but books is, there are some non-reading activities that simply can’t be ignored. Well, at least not for long. Like, as long as it takes me to read another chapter?

1. Clean the house

It looks like a bunch of cows tromped through here and the pile of laundry is beginning to rival my TBR mountain. Maybe if I hide a book under it, it’ll motivate me to fold it all?


2. Eat something

Why do I always get hungry when I have three pages left? Seriously! It’s like my stomach has synchronized its schedule with my reading habits. I guess this is why finger food was invented.


3. Finish that overdue assignment

I really should have finished it before starting a new book. But it’s a pretty short book. Well, sort of short. Maybe if I read really fast I’ll have enough time to finish the assignment too.

Challenge accepted!

4. Go to the store

I know we’re getting low on just about everything. But going to the store means getting dressed, and being out in public. I might have to actually talk to someone!

Now I need to read to overcome the shock of such a terrifying idea. Bummer.

5. Finish knitting my friend’s baby blanket

Seriously. I’m going to have to give it to her next kid since the first one is in kindergarten now.

But I just got to a really good part! I’ll get to the blanket after I find out what happens next.

Maybe.

6. Exercise

I’m in such terrible shape. I can’t even make it up the stairs without panting. Maybe if I leave a book on the top step?

7. Catch up on my emails

I’ve been trying to ignore that angry red number in the corner. Who knew numbers could be so judgmental? I mean, most of them are probably spam anyway, right? Right! Okay, back to reading.

8. Bake the cupcakes for my sister’s birthday

Bake cute cupcakes, or read a book? Cupcakes, or book? Cupcakes, book?

If I bake them now I might end up eating them all before we leave. I can’t let that happen. Book it is!

9. Pack for the family camping trip

Aw man, I guess I’ll have to leave my … Wait. Who goes camping without books? Isn’t that a rule or something? Sweet! I’ll start packing … as soon as I finish this page.


10. Go to sleep already!

Just one more chapter.

Okay, one more page.

It’s 2 am?! Yikes! I’ll put it down after this paragraph.

Wait, is that my alarm clock?

The 4 types of knitters


I learned to knit when I was about 10 and have dabbled with it off and on ever since. I’ve made wash clothes, scarves, hats, gloves. At one point I even learned to crochet (gasp!).

I also know quite a few knitters and I’ve learned that there are basically four different types.

Type 1: Pattern required, fiber snob

These knitters yarn shop in two interchangeable steps. 1. Find perfect yarn. 2. Find perfect pattern. Sometimes they find the pattern first, sometimes they find the yarn. But rest assured, they cannot leave the yarn shop without both (or at least not without plans for fulfilling the other step). There is hardly ever any free styling for these knitters. If it doesn’t have a pattern, they won’t be knitting it.

They are also yarn snobs, or as my mother says it, fiber snobs. There is nothing fake in these knitters’ projects. You’ll never catch them fingering anything acrylic, polyester, or synthetic. If it didn’t come straight from an animal or plant, they won’t even notice it. (Unless the tags are missing, but they don’t talk about those embarrassing moments.)

These are the most organized, structured knitters you’ll ever meet. Give them a pattern and they’ll find the exact yarn needed for it, then churn out a perfect sweater that looks just like the picture. (Don’t tell my mother, but fiber snobs also find the softest yarn.)

Type 2: Pattern required, fiber opportunist

These knitters need patterns as much as Type 1s. Give them a skein and tell them to knit whatever comes to mind and they’ll panic.

However, give them a pattern and they will knit with whatever is available. Oh sure, they love exploring yarn shops as much as any knitter (it’s a therapeutic experience, feeling all the delicious yarns), but they aren’t picky about what it’s made of. If they like it, they’ll take it.

These kind of knitters almost always go for the pattern books first. They love feeling the yarns, but are rarely inspired without a pattern to look at first. They’re also a lot of fun to explore yarn with since they touch first and read tags second.

Type 3: Free spirit, fiber snob

These knitters are commonly seen sitting in waiting rooms, bus stops, and coffee shops while their needles seem to have a mind of their own. They never need a pattern, and some actually find patterns too confining, but they will knit from one if they happen to like it. They also never knit with anything fake and a good chunk of their wardrobe they made themselves. (It’s not uncommon for these kind of knitters to be health foodies as well.)

They’re constantly creating and often find ways of putting discordant things together to make something surprisingly beautiful.

Type 4: free spirit, fiber opportunist

These knitters are generally hobby knitters. They find patterns confining and overwhelming and almost always prefer to knit without them. They’re less concerned with learning new stitches and techniques as simply knitting whatever they feel like.

These are the knitters you see most often in Michaels and Walmart (though they’ll wander a boutique yarn shop for fun too), and they aren’t nearly as familiar as fiber snobs with the horror of needing more of a particular yarn only to find that it’s been discontinued. Any kind of yarn will do for them and they don’t really care if what they’re making doesn’t come out just right. They simply enjoy the experience of making something with their hands.

For my part, I’m an occasionally snobby Type 4. It’s unavoidable when your mother is a brilliant Type 1. (Love you mom!)

Any other knitters out there? What type of knitter are you?

8 Tips On Caring For Your TBR List

To the less reading obsessed, a TBR (to-be-read) list is an inconsequential part of their life. To some it might even be a completely foreign concept. But to a bookworm, the TBR list is an entity unto itself. It grows like a St. Bernard puppy. It leaps in sudden, random directions like an adolescent cat. And it can swiftly become unmanageable like a spooked horse.

So, if your list has gotten out of hand and you’ve resolved to finally deal with it this year, or you’re just looking for some new ideas, here are 8 tips to help you in the care of your TBR list.

1. Set strict boundaries.


(https://onsizzle.com/i/me-at-the-bookstore-me-no-me-i-cant-have-4337055)

If you aren’t vigilant, your list will get out and bring home all kinds of friends until your house is bursting with so many books, you might lose track of your original list. This doesn’t mean your TBR can’t have friends. Just make sure it doesn’t bring home too many.

2. Exercise it regularly.


(http://thoughtfulspot.typepad.com/blog/2012/05/thoughtfuls-thursday-book-faire.html)

If you don’t actually read the books in your list, it will get so out of shape, there will be no hope of getting it back to a reasonable size. See #7 if this one is particularly difficult.

3. Feed it healthy choices.


(dailydot.relaymedia.com)

You know what they say. Everything in moderation. Don’t stop reading your favorite genres, but be sure to keep your list well rounded with some variety.

4. Practice obedience and discipline.


(http://whisper.sh/whisper/0515a5982a32232425950179139939e4a3d8d1/You-cant-read-all-day-if-you-dont-start-in-the-morning)

Whip that list into shape with a plan. Lack of discipline leads to bad habits and bad habits leads to an unmanageable list.

5. Keep it well groomed.


(http://novelgoddess.blogspot.com/2011/11/its-monday-that-means-it-is-time-for.html?m=1)

Bath time is never easy, especially if your list is more cat than dog. But books left in the list too long tend to attract dirt and fleas that can eat away at the careful discipline you’ve just established with #4. Clean out the books you know you won’t actually read. Grooming is difficult, but it must be done.

6. Clean up its messes.


(https://undeadlabs.com/2015/12/studio/developer-bio-cale-schupman/)

Sometimes a book in our list will leave us with a steaming heap of disappointment. Don’t spread it around with a distasteful review. Let it be known that the book didn’t sit well with your list, but allow others to decide for themselves. Every list’s diet is different. This is something we all need to respect.

7. Give it regular check-ups.


(http://blog.whooosreading.org/15-most-accurate-school-librarian-memes/)

Nothing helps with #2,3 and 4 – well, all of them, really – like accountability. Find a reliable, experienced librarian, or at least fellow TBR parents, and meet with them regularly, whether in person or online. This will help to keep your plan on track and for sharing other tips on keeping your list happy and healthy.

8. Don’t forget your other pets (hobbies).


(https://imgflip.com/i/14a0rm)

This one can be hard for parents of particularly unruly TBR lists, but it is necessary. If you let your list take up too much of your life, all your other pets (hobbies) will begin to feel unloved. Don’t neglect them for the sake of your list.

Every TBR list is special and unique and should be treated with utmost love and care. Hopefully these tips will help bring your list back to its happy, healthy self, or if your list is already doing well, they will help to keep that momentum going. May this new year see many TBR lists being read and cared for better than before and may those TBR
lists bring their owners even greater happiness.